Welcome to the new YOSC forums! Feel free to start a thread and (re?) introduce yourself or offer some advice about the forum itself. Sick of this message? Close it by clicking the "X" on the upper right.
  • EugeneEugene June 2010
    Posts: 1,684
    I'm trying to get into the whole cigar scene. Fat people and cigars is just an image that works every time. I will be documenting my progress here.

    My first cigar in a long time was a Bacarat at a cookout the other day. It was much better than whatever other cigars I've had because it inspired me to try a few more, so I guess I'd say that was a success. Since then I've outfitted myself with a cheap butane torch, cigar cutter, and a small humidor.

    Today I smoked a Graycliffe 1666 (Presidente), and was unimpressed, though the marketing material leads me to believe I don't quite the have the pallete to understand the complexity, or whatever.

    Yeah, this thread will be full of snobby-sounding sentences like that, so let's all (one and a half) of us just get used to that.

    On the menu for the next few weeks:

    [list]
    [*] Man o War Special Edition (Figurado)
    [*] Gurkha Centurian (Perfecto)
    [*] Gurkha Legend (Robusto)
    [*] Three AJ "Trifecta" cigars that came in a (free) sampler whose exact names I'll post when I try each individual one
    [/list]

    I'll be doing one or two a week.
  • raging+drunk+ladraging drunk lad June 2010
    Posts: 6,459
    I used to do the odd stogie. It was so long ago that I don't remember what I used to smoke. Are you going to bring it up to Troy on Friday?
  • EugeneEugene June 2010
    Posts: 1,684
    I hadn't thought about Troy -- I had completely forgotten that he was a cigar buff. Remind me to bring it up with him, though probably not this Friday -- we're extremely short on time. But definitely the next session.
  • EugeneEugene June 2010
    Posts: 1,684
    I had one of the AJ Fernandez cigars today. La Herencia Cubana, to be specific. It started off quite nicely complex but then mellowed out to a taste I wasn't too fond of. Still, would smoke again and all that. Better than the Graycliffe, anyway.
  • raging+drunk+ladraging drunk lad June 2010
    Posts: 6,459
    Going to nerd it up with old friends. Got a Hoyo de Monterrey to smoke with him. He stuck with the habit a lot longer than I did, apparently (inherited the taste for it from his father). I used to do favours for people in high school in exchange for stogies.
  • EugeneEugene July 2010
    Posts: 1,684
    Haven't updated in a while.

    I brought a few cigars to smoke for July 4th, and someone there brought an authentic Cuban Cohiba. So there were a whole bunch of people smoking cigars and passing them around. Most important take-away there was that large-scale social smoking completely ruins the experience. I think maybe a group of people can smoke cigars as long as they don't share them (much) and are respectful and patient. This was not that.

    Second, I was looking forward to sampling my first Cuban. Unfortunately, the person who brought it had not taken care of it at all (we didn't ask for specifics; didn't want to know) and it was extremely dry. Despite that, my father insisted its quality came through. I'm afraid I could not detect what it was he was so impressed with. It tasted like dry grass. Reading through a few Cohiba (Cuban, not Dominican) reviews and they mention that unless aged well they tend to be grassy and young-tasting and should be aged.

    Apparantly when you buy certain high quality cigars, they are not pre-aged at all and due to sale in low quantities, are rarely stored long at the warehouse. Compare this to most cigars, which distributors buy in bulk and, if the distributor is good, stored correctly and basically unintentionally aged. This is why buying cigars from large reputable distributors is actually a good idea.

    Anyway, my first Cuban was a disappointment but that's alright. The other cigars there were all brough by me, all Gurkha's. I had picked up a sampler. The Turk started off interestingly spicy but burned weirdly and became rather mild in the second and final thirds. There was a maduro (dark) Gukha there that we rather enjoyed the complexity and oiliness of, but I forgot the actual name of the cigar... I'll look it up later but it's nothing to write home about. The best of the Gurkhas was the LH7. Square-shaped, it was mild but really aromatic and smooth. Easy, enjoyable smoke. Anyway, I wouldn't condemn the Turk over this one experience... as I said above, the environs were not condusive to quality.

    At some point a while back, I smoked the Man O War Virtue that came in the sampler I hinted at in my first post. I was not impressed, but I don't recall why.

    But this recap has a happy ending. Yesterday, I accidentally smoked the Gurkha Legend, thinking I had two of them (meaning it must have come from the Gukha sampler), but the other one is actually not a Legend. I can't figure out WHAT it is, but not a Legend. The Legend is one of the pricier cigars I have and I meant to save it until I was sure I wouldn't miss it's value as I might have done with the Greycliffe.

    I'm glad I picked it up accidentally because it was the best cigar I've smoked so far. Strong but not overpowering, with a complex, layered taste that I'm not qualified to fully describe. It changed every third or so, and did so in a way where I couldn't pick a favorite section. Subtle changes throughout the whole thing but never a decline in quality.

    I was disappointed when I realized it was one of the pricier cigars I had because I had been thinking it was a cheapo (relatively speaking) from a sampler. The singles are about $15 a pop. However, I didn't give up and searched around Google a bit more. I found a store selling them for the same price... but they also had bundles of 25 of these cigars for 89.99 ($3.60 per). Being a little incredulous, I did a bit of googling on the store itself and found it had a reputation for the occassional excellent price on bundles. And then I did a Google on the store and cigar itself, and sure enough some people reported that they had recieved a bundle of 25 excellent, authentic Gurkha Legends for $90. So I ordered it... will probably bring a stack for myself and Jaimar to smoke in Puerto Rico.

    Behold: http://www.jrcigars.com/index.cfm?page=cigars&brand=GURKHA%20LEGEND
  • raging+drunk+ladraging drunk lad July 2010
    Posts: 6,459
    I can't really do it regularly. Or rather, I choose not to do it regularly, opting for special occasions only--when I was smoking with the guys back at that party, the first hit was like a punch to the back of my throat. I got used to it after a while again and appreciated the flavour and experience, but after quitting doing it regularly I think I've lost my overall taste for it.

    ...But even now I've got a vague hankering for one.
  • EugeneEugene July 2010
    Posts: 1,684
    You might just be doing it wrong, with all due respect. I'm not speaking from experience here... just telling you what I've read. But a lot of places tell you to take it easy -- smoke a robusto or smaller, with a light wrapper. The darker ones make the smoke much heavier. And don't inhale. Back of your throat might be too far.

    And I felt myself getting close to nicotine poisoning towards the end of some of my earlier smokes. I started bringing ice-cold tea with me. Not only did it completely take the sting out of the nicotine "punch," but it actually combines REALLY well with the taste of cigars. A lot of smokers on forums have favorite drinks, and it's not all scotch and whiskey... saw one guy who swore by Dr Pepper. Iced tea works really well for me -- the taste from the tea herbs mingles with the cigar. After a year or so, I might graduate to scotch, though I doubt I'll have a long-term taste for the stuff...
  • EugeneEugene July 2010
    Posts: 1,684
    I bought some Puerto Rican cigars when I was there on vacation. I regret not buying more but the store was kinda questionable-looking, though a quick inspection of the cigars themselves seemed okay.

    I'm really glad I bought as many as I did (15) because they were totally awesome. They are the best cigars I've smoked so far. Totally different from the boatload of Gurkha's I've been smoking recently, even better than my favorite Ghurka Legend I posted about above.

    Keep in mind this is both surprising and not surprising at all because Puerto Rico is not a major exporter of cigars at all. The cigars I bought are not exported at all as far as I can tell and apparantly are just a locally-grown, small operation. Real nice.
  • raging+drunk+ladraging drunk lad July 2010
    Posts: 6,459
    Did you have to jump through any customs hoops?
  • EugeneEugene July 2010
    Posts: 1,684
    Nope. Puerto Rico is part of the US.

    Funny story, actually. It was Puerto Rican Independence Day while we were there, and we went to the beach. Crazy packed but really cool experience never-the-less. While I was there, I asked some Puerto Ricans why it was called Independence Day, and they said because it was the day they gained independence by no longer being controlled by Spain. I didn't want to touch off any hotspots so I didn't follow this up with the obvious: Isn't it a bit ironic for a commonwealth owned by the US to be celebrating their independence?
  • raging+drunk+ladraging drunk lad April 2011
    Posts: 6,459
    Right, question.

    Me and a friend of mine were smoking Cohibas from his humidor, but they seemed rather dried out. Now he's got a dozen or so in that humidor... is there any way to resuscitate them, or are we cursed with dried out Cohibas?
  • raging+drunk+ladraging drunk lad June 2011
    Posts: 6,459
    And to bring closure to that question: the answer was bread.

    Found this link on cigar etiquette: http://www.cigartrends.com/etiquette.php

    Agree? Disagree?
  • EugeneEugene June 2011
    Posts: 1,684
    I don't know about bread, but a dried out cigar should be fine if you just leave it in a properly-humidified humidor for a few days. I'm told that that Cohiba's generally taste much better when rested in a humidor for a few months. In my limited experience with them, I could detect no difference. Cuban Cohibas, that is. Red dots are great either way.

    That list of etiquitte is basically what I follow. At least some of the items on that list, like etiquitte in any field, is not just the "polite" way to treat a cigar but also will bring out the best taste. It took me half a year of heavy smoking (1/day on average) to discover that I was lighting them too fast, and too hot.

    I'm amused by the fact that lighting up a new cigar less than fifteen minutes after the first is considered obsessive. For me, if I smoke more than one in a single day, that's unusual. I've never smoked more than two in a single day.
  • raging+drunk+ladraging drunk lad September 2011
    Posts: 6,459

    Sort of relevant bump. I think between the different ways to smoke tobacco, the pipe has become my preferred method. In terms of portion size and time, I think pipes are the most moderate without having to suck on a stogie for half an hour. And they're inconvenient enough that I can't just chain smoke like I can with fags.

  • FerretFerret September 2011
    Posts: 972

    True cigar story.


    For my father's 50th year birthday, I bought him a very expensive cigar. I don't recall why I thought it was a good idea as he's not a smoker at all. 


    Anyway, he never got around to smoking it, so it just stayed in its little metallic tube for years and years. Finally he decided to smoke it for his 60th year birthday, and in preparation for it he put it in a home made humidor to get it nice and moist. The humidor was a plastic box and half a potato.


    Then he forgot about it untill the day before his birthday. By then it was half covered in a green mold. I think we ended up sharing the half of it that the mold hadnt gotten in to. Was a damn good cigar though. 

  • September 2011
    Posts: 0
  • September 2011
    Posts: 0
  • raging+drunk+ladraging drunk lad September 2011
    Posts: 6,459

    What a nice cigar story, Ferret. Thank you for sharing.

  • FerretFerret September 2011
    Posts: 972

    My nice story has a morale to it. 

  • EugeneEugene September 2011
    Posts: 1,684

    Well, I'm not sure I understand the moral, but you can actually smoke a moldy cigar, as long as you're not actually putting your mouth on the actual mold. Also, sometimes what looks like mold is actually not mold... it's some sort of oily stuff, basically a good sign.

Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

Sign In with OpenID Sign In with Google

Sign In Apply for Membership

In this Discussion

Poll

No poll attached to this discussion.

Who's Online (0)